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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the main events of the task 12 months. >> in europe, it was all about the debt crisis. greece and spain were the worst hit. >> eventually, it was the european central bank's controversial bond-buying program that manage to come down the markets -- calm down the markets. >> germany's finance minister says he thinks the worst is behind us. is he right? >> the wildfires in 2012 were the worst spain had experienced in years, but it was not the only disaster the country had to deal with. the financial sector was also in flames. right from the beginning of the year, it was clear that the eurozone had a tough time ahead. credit rating agencies handed out significant downgrades to spain and portugal in particular. europe's firefighting coalition of finance ministers hoped a fiscal pact with tight budgetary controls and national debt breaks would need future crises in the bud, but some economists were more realistic. >> the fiscal pact was basically superfluous. we already knew that all the countries were trying to cut back. weather or not they continue making cuts in 2018, which is what the fis
be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking, but if they see continued failure of eurozone finance ministers to agree to this, we might get the restoration of finance of duties, which of costa much trouble in recent years. the deadline for agreeing is no overarching bank advisory super body is meant to be in place on january 1. it does not look likely, and a lot of frustration at this meeting today with the sides deeply divided and no sign of agreement. that, of course, is the basic issue -- why has there not an overarching supervisory control? precisely because it was difficult to do then. the eurozone crisis highlighted that failure, and we've still got the same problems blighting the regular meetings of finance ministers. >> despite the eurozone crisis, german exports are still robust. >> we will have the latest on the german export data later on in the program, but first, in britain, the duchess of cambridge is said to be feeling a little bit better after spending
a look at the bond curve. spain, this will be a good proxy for now. we'll get the ten year for italy in just a second. 35.34% is the level there. u.s. benefiting from fund flows well. choppy trade across the picture here. let's look at the italian curve before we get the results later today. we are seeing green across the board, so yields dipping before that probably has more to do with the political rhetoric we're seeing especially coming from berlusconi. under 4.6% for the ten-year and on the short and two, a bit of a rally. finally, let's close taking a look at the forex. euro/dollar is weaker. and it's holding just above 1.30. and the dollar/yen, this is the one sixuan mentioned to watch. heading into japanese elections, stocks outperform adding oots .1% to 83.35 this morning. >>> south korea's central bank may be worried about factors in the economy, but the dok says the economy is stronger than it used to be. more on that next. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp o
small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan will stick around. time to bring you today's global markets report. let's go to asia for the update. >> that upbeat pmi data failed to lift greater china markets. there is pessimism over general lack of policy and also fears that over 800 companies lining up for ipos could further drain liquidity out of the
economies like spain -- >> good or bad surprise? >> no, a good surprise. whereas economies like spain, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is g
in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want to draw your attention here. the ten-year gild in the u.k., 1.957%. extraordinary. we're not off the 2% market in the spread, widening significantly. coming up on the program today, the count is set to get underway in south korea following general elections. we'll head to seoul to find out whether the country could elect its first female leader. >>> the bank of england releases minutes from its latest polic
a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here because the dollar/yen was lower. it has regained some ground in the last few hours or so. the kospi shedding about
model in spain. >> first of all, warren buffett, there again i think the contradictory as of all of this is at play. on the one hand, yes, there have always been people like him on the side of the wealthy, the big corporations, who have a clear understanding that at a certain point it becomes dangerous to keep going in that direction. you cannot keep having a smaller and smaller number of people doing really well in a sea of people that are having a harder and harder time. pushing, but don't kill the goose that lays the golden egg in the end. so there are always voices like that. not the only one. there are a whole bunch of people like that to see that and to have the courage or the comfort or the security to say it. remember also, the same warren buffett he says that is a major owner of the moody's corporation , and the moody's corporation was a central player in providing aaa ratings for securities we now know were worthless, are worthless, fraudulent, and someone. and so, you know, he is as he would himself admit a part of the system and therefore draw and to many of the activ
concerned about france and spain than i am about italy. >> we'll talk about those. >> let me add asking. if italy is in this situation now, it relied on the easy way out. and politicians, including berlusconi, didn't have the foresight to see that. >> thank you so much for coming by. >>> staying at the eurozone, investors will be watching for anything coming from the italian crisis. the results of the spanish bond actions are due around 12:40 cst. hsbc was hit with a $1.9 billion fine. the ceo said we accept responsibility for our mistakes and are profoundly sorry for them. >> a full year loft loss of 4.7 billion euros, thinksen krup has more details. >> they are starting to look at the positive of what i would call a -- strategy, i.e., a clean sweep when it comes to the business strategy of thyssenkrupp as well as the instruct occur and the refocusing on being transparent and definitely being something shareholders should trust. so no dividends, jobs may go and the sale of celiamerica being looked at. the cfo says there's a handful of interested parties in that particular party of the
not do the siesta -- the nap after lunch, and that is a ritual that was important in spain back then, and it still is today. >> the cattle trader from spain gets up early in the morning and does not come home again until late. between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m., he takes an afternoon nap, a siesta. >> i need these one-and-a-half hours after lunch. if i do not sleep, i do not feel well. then i do not enjoy work, and i am just not myself. >> the long spanish siesta still exists, even in bustling major cities. many businesses still shut at 1:30 in the afternoon and open again at 5:00 p.m. carlows also uses that break for a nap, for now at least. -- carlos. >> i think soon we will have to stay open after lunch. this is a tourist area. we have to stay open because it is customer friendly even though a lot of people are against it. but business is business. >> to make sure tourists in particular are not faced with shuttered doors, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week ins
. >> it is a rare thing for you. hang around long enough, it will go your way. thanks for that. >> cheers. >>> spain. the treasury is setting up three, seven, and ten-year bonds. they're now pre-funding for 2013. we've got the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural par
, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist who says the weaker yen team is going to continue into the new year and offer some strategic calls. >>> as europeans get back to trading equities, let's get a sense of what we might see in the markets today. chris joins us from ibg group. chris, good morning. >> morning. >> we've seen a pretty quiet couple of days here. we've been talking about strength in the dax and whatnot. what's on your radar screen? >> as you say, it remains a fundamentally quiet day. unfortunately the fiscal cliff is dominating everything, really, what little traders are doing is being over-shadowed by the lack of movement, rather, in washington. >> and we've just heard allen capper who is with us talking about more volatility in the first quarter.
. and, of course, it is recognized. >> what's your view on spain? the country managed to avoid bailout so far, but will not meet its deficit target for the full year. do you think spain should be given more time? >> well, first of all, i think that, again, spain is going in the right direction. when you look at the current account, the deficit, you see that it had been diminished massively since the peak that they had in 2008, 2009. and, you know, as a very short summing up, it's been divided by more than five, though it's very, very encouraging. on the other hand, you have unit labor costs which have been diminishing quite a lot and the exports of spain are very dynamic today. so it also demonstrates that hard work is being done. it's difficult. it's tough, but going in the right direction. i trust that the global observers are observing progressively and the adjustment is proceed. in spain and in all the countries that are under adjustment. >> now, lonmin's ceo ian farmer is stepping down while being treated for a serious illness after being first admitted to hospital back in august.
rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under severance pay but now just 200,000. why hire somebody to pay that much to fire them? >> a very good question. to be sure that they want them. it is the decision not allot of employers are willing to make. john: i assume people cheat? >> lot of people cheat. they are expected and that is what keeps the inspector in business. it is easier and cheaper to bribe the inspector then goes to the motion to pay the taxes and declare an come and workers. john: singapore has a booming economy. no minimum-wage comment no laws against discrimination. if you fire, four weeks termination notice and unemployment is at 2%. >> you can start of business, flexible, hire and fire and it makes it attractive. john: thank you anne jolis and thank god we don't have those dumb laws. we have plenty. weird getting more and people want more like a guaranteed
-term bond yields are long-term bond yields are falling sharply in spain, for instance, and showing positive signs, among others, that point to a gradual return of confidence to the euro area. >> noyer noted borrowing costs for spain, france and other countries in the region have declined that he pointed out is due in part to a european central bank program to buy bonds of debt-ridden nations. the governor also said a stable bond market is necessary for every central bank to implement effective monetary policy. >>> most nuclear powers plants in japan are offline after last year's disaster. another energy-saving campaign is now under way to avert power shortages this winter. the government and power companies are calling on households and businesses to reduce electricity usage through late march. this is to cope with heating demand during the cold season. the campaign covers all parts of the country except for the southern most prefecture of okinawa. officials are asking customers in hokkaido, japan's coldest region, to cut back on energy use by 7% from the level before the nuclear accident.
're the only country that does it, let's be like france, greece, and spain and not have one and get to the cliff-- >> a quick reminder, by the way, adam of the 16 trillion dollars of debt that currently is on the table for the united states. 6 billion of that debt, neil, has been put on the books under president obama's watch. >> 6 trillion. >> 6 trillion. we're talking about adding on to that. where is he he coming up with the numbers? which economist is he citing and where are the polls-- >> warren buffett said earlier in the week it's not about economics it's about making people feel good. -- let me stop a second. did you say where he does he pull these numbers out of. >> seriously, seriously. >> neil: i wanted to make sure i heard you correctly. talk about a pain in the gas. the price is record high this time of year and we're getting new proposals to hike gasoline prices to pay down the debt. where will it go. the gang from forbes is on that. that's at the top of the hour. forget having the in-laws over for dinner, more families are shacking up together. young, old and everyone
, and spain are just a few of the countries which have summoned israel's ambassador to express their concerns. there are warnings that new settlements in east jerusalem and the west bank could threaten the very viability of a two- state solution. >> israel's prime minister does not shirk controversy and is not afraid of upsetting his friends, but benjamin netanyahu might suddenly be feeling rather isolated. a number of european countries are upset over the thorny issue of settlements. for years, israel has been warned by allies that continued expense of israel's settlements on occupied jewish land is detrimental to a two-state solution. it was when israel signalled its intention to develop this strategically-important area known as e-1 that the row intensified. if this big piece of land was to become a jewish settlement, detractors say it would be the final nail in the coffin of the two-state solution. with dozens of jewish settlements already in the area, it is argued that developing e- 1 and his separation area around it, -- and this separation around it would cut off east jerusalem from th
a recovery occurring in the eurozone, nkts look forward to 2014 and beyond. >> spain? >> for sure. >> when? >> probably in the second quarter. >> that's an interesting idea, all at once. david owens from jeffries, thank you so much for stopping by. >>> straight ahead, economic policies for next year and what is in store for markets if it mean slower, short-term growth? can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground at fedex of. >>> shinzo abe wastes no time on calling on the bank of japan to ease interest rates. >>> get a little, give a little. reports say john boehner may be willing to raise the tax rates on the rich if president obama raises the cuts. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment in europe. kpn shares fall as the dutch telecom group scraps the divide dividend. >>> okay. we're into new trading week here. the xetra dax and the french mark
about the clock tower yet. at 230 feet tall, this is built as a replica of of the clock tower in spain. this was electrically i polite. electrically operated? >> correct, but it still can be run mechanically. ithe clock master comes in at te time that it is changing. we also have clock watchers across the street who tell us if it is off by a second, so he is very attached to the clock. >> we have a clock master. and look at this, the hands of the clock. look how big they
. they are considering plans to phase-out the atomic energy altogether over the next several decades. spain, a flower in the face. it is the annual flower fight using eggs and firecrackers and flour. and it is a day marking the innocence, spain's equivalence of april fool's. it is this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >>> a french constitutional panel is saying goodbye to that country's staggering 75% tax rate on the wealthy. the panel has ruled the tax is unconstitutional and unfair. let me say it again. 75% on the wealthy. it was set to kick in at the start of 2013 and will hit anyone hitting a million euros. critics didn't like it. they said it would drive away france's wealthy population. joining me now on the phone from paris is katherine fields. she is a correspondent for global radio news. katherine, why was this tax overturned? >> it was overturned because the court said it failed to rec recognize equality before public burden. what this means is it has been applied to individuals rather than households. the court knows this top rate would have applied to a married couple, for example
to phase-out the atomic energy altogether over the next several decades. spain, a flower in the face. it is the annual flower fight using eggs and firecrackers and flour. and it is a day marking the innocence, spain's equivalence of april fool's. it is this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >>> a french constitutional panel is saying goodbye to that country's staggering 75% tax rate on the wealthy. the panel has ruled the tax is unconstitutional and unfair. let me say it again. 75% on the wealthy. it was set to kick in at the start of 2013 and will hit anyone hitting a million euros. critics didn't like it. they said it would drive away france's wealthy population. joining me now on the phone from paris is katherine fields. she is a correspondent for global radio news. katherine, why was this tax overturned? >> it was overturned because the court said it failed to rec recognize equality before public burden. what this means is it has been applied to individuals rather than households. the court knows this top rate would have applied to a married couple, for example, if one mem
is not fine. what beshould do is start a war with spain or france. if we go that everyone will rally to the flag. the south will come in. everybody wants to be beat up on the europeans. he doesn't say it idly. he tells the ambassador from spain and france that it's a deal. the question is what does lincoln want to do. lincoln doesn't think the south is bluffing. he has a problem. the north is not unified behind a war effort. maybe only a third of northern want to fight a war to keep the south in union. about a third are happy about it. we get rid of them. they are fine. let's get rid of the south. we don't have to -- let them go. about a third don't care. we don't want them to leave we don't want to fight for it either. lincoln does something clever. some people want to spend armed expedition to reinforce sumter. some want to sneak these troops in to reinforce them. and they want to give it up. lincoln doesn't do any of them. lincoln announces publicly that he's going send an e petition it's only going to have food and no weapons or ammunition. just food. he's forcing the decision to
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval in nevada but the biggest step of all is a change in federal law, and if online gambling does become legal nationwide, zynga is sure to face some big competition from the casinos. zynga is struggling to sel
of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under severance pay but now just 200,000. why hire somebody to pay that much to fire them? >> a very good question. to be sure that they want them. it is the decision not allot of employers are willing to make. john: i assume people cheat? >> lot of people cheat. they are expected and that is what keeps the inspector in business. it is easier and cheaper to bribe the inspector then goes to the motion to pay the taxes and declare an come and workers. john: singapore has a booming economy. no minimum-wage comment no laws against discrimination. if you fire, four weeks termination notice and unemployment is at 2%. >> you can start of business, flexible, hire and fire and it makes it attractive. john: thank you anne jolis and thank god we don't have those dumb laws. we have plenty. we
for affordable wine. the quality of inexpensive wines is really high. this is evodia from spain. $9.99 a bottle, a big, robust full-flavored red wine. one of the secret tricks of the wine business, if you look on the back of the bottle it says eric solomon selections. one thing is there are importers who act as curators. they only bring in things they love. importers are always on the back of the bottle. without knowing the wine, you know it's going to be a good wine. that is a little insider. >> you didn't love that? >> no, i did. if you're not an expert, there is a $9.99, how do you know it's that one and not sort of a cheap wine? >> partly by tasting a lot. if you go to a good store -- find a store where people pay attention, they listen to what you say and like and they're not going to try to sell you something that's bad because they want your business. trust those guys. >> pascual toso, argentine malbec. that is $10.99 a bottle. holiday buying. you know you're going to pour wine for a lot of people. buy by the case. most stores give you 10% -- you need to buy lots and lots of wine. 10%, 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)